Date: 
24 January 2022 - 09:30 to 25 January 2022 - 12:30
Location: 
Online
 

This is a two-day interactive workshop taking place on the 24th and 25th of January 2022 from 09.30 to 12.30 GMT each day.

 

Event Overview

 

There is a misconception in the research community that the use of secondary data does not entail legal considerations. Secondary data is an intellectual property of the data owner, so any use of that data may require the data owner’s permission or may be subject to certain terms and conditions. Therefore, this online workshop is specifically designed to highlight these issues and help you overcome these.

In this two-day online workshop, participants will understand what needs to be taken into account when creating, using and sharing data. It will cover the following topics:

 
  • What is secondary data?
  • Introduction to the copyright
  • Layers and duration of copyright
  • Copyright licenses
  • Copyright in an international context
  • Copyright exceptions
  • Other rights
 

The two-day workshop will include lectures and presentations with individual exercises and group discussions.

 

Learning objectives

 
  • Gain a better understanding of copyright such as what is copyright, what is covered, who owns it and what is the duration?
  • Identify copyright exemptions and gain a better appreciation of fair dealing
  • Be able to differentiate between available copyright licences and assess these licences when publishing their own data
  • Be able to identify country-level diversity in copyright laws and gain a basic understanding of other types of rights in data
 
 

Target Audience

 

This workshop is intended for anyone who wants to learn about basic copyright principles and is interested in creating, sharing and using data.

Please note the number of attendees is limited and we kindly ask those that register to be able to attend both days.

 

Please note that the event is already fully booked. If you register, you will be put on the waiting list.

Register

 

Speakers

 

Hina Zahid is the Senior Research Data Services Officer working in the UK Data Service's Research Data Management section based at the UK Data Archive, University of Essex. She leads on the ethical aspects of research data management, sharing and reuse. She works proactively with researchers, and research centres to provide guidance, advice and training to achieve the implementation of good data management practices, and to optimise the sharing and archiving of data for research.

 

Hannah Pyman joined the University of Essex Library team in September 2016 as a Graduate Trainee, going on to become Interlending and Document Delivery Assistant in April 2017. From September 2019 until July 2020 she was an Information Literacy Co-ordinator. She began her new role as Scholarly Communications Co-ordinator in July 2020. Hannah’s role covers support across the research lifecycle, ranging from literature searching and evaluating resources, to publishing (including open access publishing), copyright, and citations.

 

Cristina Magder manages the UK Data Service's Data Collections Development and Research Data Management teams at the UK Data Archive. She leads the research data management portfolio of support and training for the UK Data Service. Her main teaching interests are data management planning, sharing and archiving data with a specific focus on licencing, data quality assurance, disclosure risk assessment, and reproducibility.

 

Maureen Haaker is a scholar in the field of qualitative methodology. She has worked with the UK Data Service for 10 years as a senior qualitative training officer and is a lecturer in the School of Social Sciences and Humanities at University of Suffolk. Her work has involved the ingest and digitisation of qualitative data, development of training for the management, deposit, and re-use of qualitative data, and the re-use of qualitative datasets for teaching and learning. She is a key contributor to Sage’s Managing and Sharing Research Data (2nd edition) and Qualitative Secondary Analysis. She is currently completing a PhD in Sociology at University of Essex.